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T E A C H I N G 

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2022-Present: Assistant Professor of Social Work, Tenure Track

Faculty of Community Services, Toronto Metropolitan University*

2021-Present: Instructor 

School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, George Brown College

 

PREVIOUS ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2018-2022: Assistant Professor of Social Work, Limited Term Faculty (LTF)

Faculty of Community Services, Toronto Metropolitan University

2020-2022: Instructor

Social Service Worker Program, First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI)

2018-2021: CUPE Instructor 

Department of Social Work, Trent University

2017-2018: CUPE Instructor 

Community Services, Chang School of Continuing Education, and

School of Social Work, Toronto Metropolitan University

2017-2018: CUPE Instructor 

School of Community Services, Seneca College

2017: OPSEU Instructor 

School of Community and Social Services, George Brown College

ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS

 

2019-Present: Academic Coordinator

Certificate in Indigenous Knowledge and Experiences

Chang School of Continuing Education, Toronto Metropolitan University

2020-Present: Course Coordinator

SWP 435: Indigenous Approaches to Social Work Practice

School of Social Work, Toronto Metropolitan University

2021-Present: Course Coordinator

SWP 301: Decolonizing Anti-Oppression Practice

School of Social Work, Toronto Metropolitan University

*Formally Ryerson University 

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W H A T   P E O P L E   A R E   S A Y I N G​

Shane is a respectful and diligent educator. He uses humility, humour, and experiential learning to engage students and ‘bring them on a transformative journey. The students were engaged, open, and active learners. Rather than relying on slides and stand-up lecturing, Shane facilitated a circle format and used ‘hooks’ to engage them in the discussion and enable their own learning. I have no doubt that Shane will only grow stronger in his role as an outstanding educator – it was a pleasure to be in his classroom! Faculty Member 

Shane is a lovely instructor who wants all of his students to succeed in his class. He is more than helpful when explaining expectations from the class on assignments and provides constructive feedback that can be used in order to better ourselves when the next assignment becomes due. This course [SWP435: Indigenous Approaches to Social Work Practice) is a perfect way to integrate other knowledges into the social work profession and prepares students to work in the field with clients who identify as Indigenous” Undergraduate Social Work Student

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C O U R S E S

GRADUATE & UNDERGRADUATE

  • Decolonizing Anti-Oppression Social Work Practice (SWP301)

  • Foundations to Social Work II (CVSW15B)

  • Indigenous Approaches to Social Work Practice (SWP435)

  • Indigenous Health and Well-being (SWP933)

  • Indigenous Knowledges in Social Work (Graduate, SK8208)

  • Preparing for Social Work Practice (SWP201)

  • Social Work Field Education Placement (SWRK3001Y)

  • Social Work Research Part I (SWP538)

  • Social Work Research Part II (SWP638)

  • Substance Use & Abuse (SWP919)

  • Spirituality in the Helping Professions (SWP930)

CERTIFICATE & COLLEGE

  • Canada’s First People (CLT100)

  • Canada’s Story: An Indigenous Perspective (CINT923)

  • Family Dynamics (HPP155)

  • Foundations of Social Work (CVSW15A)

  • Foundations of Sociology (SOC100)

  • Indigenous Knowledges in Practice (CVSW932)

  • Indigenous Peoples, Politics, and Reconciliation (CINT910)

  • Introduction to Indigenous Worldviews (CINT922)​

  • Introduction to Social Service Worker Practice I (SSW101)

  • Introduction to Social Work Practice II (SSW104)

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R E S E A R C H    O V E R V I E W 

My primary research focuses are critical Indigenous studies, urban Indigenous identities, colonial and decolonization theories, Indigenous research and knowledge methodologies, and Indigeneity. My research program was initiated by my curiosity about identity formation and maintenance in relationships with those who are also influenced by tactics of settler-colonialism, where navigation and negotiation of spaces and places based on dominant measures are all too common. Moreover, this research project expands my research scholarship, based on my previous master’s research, Are You Native Enough? An Analysis of White Passability Among Indigenous Peoples in an Urban Context, which focuses on the exploration of the colonial interference imposed onto Indigenous identities through forced removal and assimilation and unearthing ways in which healing can create personal and cultural sovereignty. 

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DOCTORAL RESEARCH 

Supervisor: David Newhouse
Working Title: The Resurgence of Urban Indigenous Identities & Contemporary Understandings of Community in Digital Spaces

Abstract:

In contemporary realities, digital spaces have undoubtedly influenced our ability to explore the world around us. Digital space is defined as, the virtual environments and online platforms that exist within the digital realm, such as the internet, social media, and mobile applications. These spaces can be used for a wide range of purposes, such as communication, commerce, entertainment, and information sharing. They allow individuals and organizations to connect, collaborate, and share information and resources in ways that were previously not possible. 

Through digital spaces, particularly social media, there has been an increase in the exploration of personhood and one’s pursuit to explore the complexities of their identities (including intersectionality and relation to place). These efforts have led to the resurgence of one’s Indigenous identity or identities, which is undoubtedly a political act of decolonization, concrete actions in which peoples (and communities) are exercising their self-determination by reclaiming their voice.

In this respect, this research will explore how digital spaces (social media) conceptualizes and impacts Indigenous identity formation, maintenance, and resurgence. Through a mixed-methods approach, different aspects will be analyzed to offer insights into how digital spaces can support communities to renew or reconstruct their Indigenous identities and understandings of community. Exploring and assessing the role of such digital spaces will offer an overview of the current practices in identity revitalization projects and new perspectives on how to best support Indigenous futures.

 

OTHER CURRENT PROJECTS (ON HOLD DUE TO DOCTORAL RESEARCH)​

My current research, Politics, Identity, & Relations in the Development of the Qalipu First Nation in Kataqmkuk (Newfoundland), is a twelve-month pilot project that will expand my research program based on my previous research, Are You Native Enough? An Analysis of White Passability Among Indigenous Peoples in an Urban Context, this new research study I am proposing will expand the concept of a cultural critique of dominant, modern relationships to "identity and authenticity" to include the 2017 decision under a federal government review of the founding list of the Qalipu First Nation of Southwestern Newfoundland. Moreover, to unearth the implications of the points-based criteria to authenticate what constitutes Indigeneity or "Indianness" under the Indian Act.  

 

PAST PROJECTS

My past research endeavours remind me that our research interests should not simply be about research topics but an interest in the way we do research. My past and current research rely heavily on the relationships he has built with Indigenous Peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. My major research paper (MRP) of my Master of Social Work degree, Are You Native Enough? An Analysis of White Passability Among Indigenous Peoples in an Urban Context focused on exploring the colonial interference imposed onto Indigenous identities through forced removal and assimilation and unearthing ways in which healing can create personal and cultural sovereignty. A review of the neoliberal ideologies and discourse was pertinent to unearth how Indigenous identities were formulated and maintained within an urban setting such as Toronto as a reference point of context. This research project was possible due to my research throughout the years of relationship building, mutual work efforts, and proven trust.

My work as part of a research group led by Dr. Jeanette Schmind focused on contextualizing (imported) Western social work knowledges and local worldviews and needs. Moreover, how individualized social work perspectives, particularly those aimed at social control, have sometimes harmed local populations. The research examined contextualized education in South Africa and Canada/Turtle Island, two countries that have an explicit agenda regarding local responsiveness, based on interviews with more than 20 faculty from the two countries as well as national focus groups to examine the perspectives of faculty in applying contextualized social work education and illuminated classroom content and strategies.

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P U B L I C A T I O N S

 

CHAPTERS

Young, S., N. (2019). Attaining Wholeness Through Re-claiming Indigenous Identity & Spirituality. In Njoki Wane, Rose Torres, and Dionisio Nyaga, eds., Transversing & Translocating Spirituality: An Epistemological, Theoretical and Pedagogical Conversation. Nsemia Inc. Toronto, Ontario. Publishers.

 

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Young, S. N. (2022). Where is Home? A Critical Review of Settler Colonialism & Mi'kmaw Claims to Authenticity in Newfoundland. Journal of Citizenship Studies. (Forthcoming, late 2022) 

Young, S., N. (2020). Politics, Identities, & Relations in the Development of the Qalipu First Nation in Taqamkuk (Newfoundland). In Progress.

Young, S., N. (2020). Mi’kmaq Migration & Culture: Influence of Settler Colonialism on Re-location & Re-establishment. (In Progress).

Young, S. N. (2017). Are You Native Enough? An Analysis of White Passability Among Indigenous Peoples in an Urban Context (master’s thesis). York University, Toronto, Canada.

 

ACADEMIC PRESENTATIONS

ORAL

Schmid, J., Young, S.N., Morgenshtern, M. (2019). Circles of Conversations: Contextualized Social Work Education. Paper presented at Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE-ACFTS), Vancouver, BC.

Schmid, J., Young, S.N. (2019). Contextualized Social Work Education: Multiple Perspectives. Paper presented at Canadian Conference on Medical Education, Kamloops, BC.

Young, S.N. (2018). Critical Social Work with Indigenous Peoples; Redefining Reciprocity & Healthy Relationships. Paper presented at Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE-ACFTS), Saskatoon, SK.

 

POSTER

Hui, C., Parsons, M., Young, S.N., Hillier, S., Stratton, T.G. (2020). Beyond mending bridges: Decolonizing research structures through co-creating respectful and equitable Indigenous-settler PLHIV partnerships. Poster presented at The 29th Annual Canadian Conference on HIV/AIDS Research Le 29e Congrès annuel canadien de recherche sur le VIH/sida, Quebec City, QC.

Hui, C., Parsons, M., Young, S.N., Hillier, S., Stratton, T.G. (2020). Beyond building more bridges: Decolonizing research structures through co-creating respectful and equitable Indigenous-settler PLHIV partnerships in a multi-site Canadian Cohort. Poster presented at AIDS 2020: 23rd International AIDS Conference (Virtual).

SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS

Joseph-Armand Bombardier Award Canada 

Graduate Scholarship – Doctoral. 

The Social Sciences and Humanities 

Research Council (SSHRC), $105,000

Dean’s PhD Scholarship

Trent University, $16,000

Graduate Research Fellowship

Trent University, $20,000

York Masters Fellowship

York University, $11,000

 

Indigenous Youth Leaders at Youth

Indigenize the Senate 2019, Nominated

Nominated By: Alejandro Mayoral Banos,

Executive Director, Indigenous Friends Association

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